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  • Guides you through the decision to get a flu vaccine. Provides info on the flu vaccine. Explains who should and should not get a flu vaccine. Covers benefits and risks. Includes interactive tool to help you make your decision.
  • You can help prevent the flu by getting a flu vaccine every year, as soon as it is available. You cannot get the flu from the vaccine. The vaccine prevents most cases of the flu. But even when the vaccine doesn't prevent the flu, it can make symptoms less severe and reduce the chance of problems from the flu. Who should...
  • Influenza vaccine can prevent influenza (flu). Flu is a contagious disease that spreads around the United States every year, usually between October and May. Anyone can get the flu, but it is more dangerous for some people. Infants and young children, people 65 years and older, pregnant people, and...
  • Many people choose not to have the influenza vaccine because of myths they believe about the disease or the vaccine. Myth: Influenza is a minor illness. Truth: Influenza and its complications caused from 3,000 to 49,000 deaths each year from 1976 to 2006 in the United States. Myth: The vaccine causes the flu. Truth: You...
  • Links to information on colds and flu. Covers at-home treatment for cold and flu symptoms, the flu vaccine, prevention of colds and flu, and medicines for the flu.
  • What is bird flu? Bird flu is an infection caused by a certain kind of avian influenza virus. Although there are many kinds of bird flu, the most common kinds that concern health workers are H5N1 and H7N9 bird flu viruses. These viruses are found in wild birds. Most of the time, wild birds don't get sick from the virus...
  • Discusses symptoms of the flu, which is caused by the influenza virus. Covers how it's spread and when people who have the flu are contagious. Discusses prevention, including getting the influenza vaccine. Offers home treatment tips.
  • Your immunity protects both you and your unborn baby (fetus). After you have been immunized (vaccinated) against or infected by a virus or bacteria, your body forms an immunity to it. Full immunity can protect you from future infection, either for a lifetime or a limited period. Partial immunity strengthens how well...
  • What are immunizations? Immunizations help keep you and your child from getting a disease. They contain medicine that causes the body to make antibodies. These antibodies can then recognize and fight the disease if you or your child is later exposed to it. Immunizations are also called vaccines or vaccinations. Why...
  • The flu and the common cold are both types of upper respiratory infections (URIs). Both are caused by viruses. But the flu is not the same as the common cold. Flu symptoms Flu symptoms are usually much worse than a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly and lasts longer. Symptoms may include: Fever. Cough. Shaking...
  • What are immunizations? Immunizations save lives. They are the best way to help protect you or your child from certain infectious diseases. They also help reduce the spread of disease to others and prevent epidemics. Most are given as shots. They are sometimes called vaccines, or vaccinations. In many cases when you get...
  • Find out the important things that happen for you and others when you're protected by the flu vaccine.
  • There has been ongoing controversy surrounding certain vaccines and their relationship to autism. Some parents have been concerned that vaccines, specifically the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and preservatives used in other childhood vaccines, play a role in children developing autism. There have been a lot of...
  • Starting at 2 months after birth, premature infants (preemies) need all the recommended immunizations that full-term infants get. The one vaccine that your preemie may not get on schedule is the hepatitis B vaccine. In full-term infants, it is usually given at birth. But this vaccine doesn't work as well in very small...
  • Resources and information for understanding COVID-19. Get care for symptoms, schedule a vaccination or booster, and order a COVID-19 test.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) creates Vaccine Information Statements (VISs), which have details about most vaccines given in the United States. The VISs are updated when needed. The information in these statements does not change often. Each VIS explains why to get the vaccine, the risks from the...
  • This section has extensive articles on fitness, nutrition, conditions, diseases, and preventive care. You'll find classes, videos about treatment options, and interactive tools. Categories include children, teens, women, men, and healthy aging.This section has extensive articles on fitness, nutrition, conditions, diseases, and preventive care. You'll find classes, videos about treatment options, and interactive tools. Categories include children, teens, women, men, and healthy aging.
  • Provides links to information about the immune system. Includes info about immunizations, HIV and autoimmune disorders, arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.
  • If you have heart failure, it is important that you do as much as possible to avoid catching colds, the flu, and other respiratory infections. Although these may be relatively minor illnesses in healthy people, they are more dangerous if you have heart failure, and you are at higher risk for dangerous complications...
  • Learn the difference between symptoms of the flu and COVID-19.
  • Provides links that give tips, like making the most of your appointment and getting better care at lower costs. Also includes links on understanding lab results and deciding whether to get a flu vaccine.
  • My child's name is __________________________. My child's birthday is _________________. My child's doctor is __________________________. The doctor's phone number is _____________________. Age Immunization Dose Notes Date given Birth Hepatitis B (HepB) 1 of 3 2 months Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) 1 of 5...
  • A person who has HIV has difficulty fighting off other infections. You can help protect the person from infections. Avoid close contact with people who have contagious illnesses until their symptoms have disappeared. This includes illnesses such as colds, the flu, or stomach flu. If you have a cold or flu, wear a...
  • Generally, infection with HIV doesn't make people sick, except for the flu-like illness that may develop shortly after they become infected. Most people who are infected with HIV get sick because their immune systems become weak and cannot fight off other infections. So preventing opportunistic infections is an...
  • Helping your infant feel better Your infant (newborn to 12 months) is less likely to be uncomfortable or upset after getting a shot if he or she is not hungry or tired. You can also help your baby during and after the shot by providing gentle comfort and reassurance. The following strategies may help you. See that your...
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